Posts Tagged ‘Dub;in’

Have you lost your MoJo?

February 12, 2020

Mojo Traiing Fuzion Communications

There is no doubt that the web is one of the most accessible ways for brands to tell their story.

The internet has made business promotion more accessible price-wise because of social media and the brand’s “shop window”, their website.

And if you know how to do it well, using the internet to get the word out there about your brand story can pay serious dividends.That’s why we here at Fuzion concentrate so much of our effort on internet-based story-telling. And today, we’re going to give you some pro tips on one aspect of how to get the most out of the internet for your brand.

Content Creation is everything, as great content is the way to grab someone’s attention, to get them to stop scrolling and to pay attention to your message…for just a moment at least, and hopefully remember you because you gave them something to smile about or to think about.

There’s a reason why content is the new buzzword for all things digital, including social media and websites. Content is King (or Queen!), and good content can tell your brand’s story in a natural and effective way. But content creation can be complicated and expensive, right?

It doesn’t have to be… (phew!)

You can create really good and engaging content for your social media channels, website and other channels using something that you have to hand right now: your mobile phone.

MoJo or Mobile Journalism, also known as mobile content creation, is an excellent way to create content that looks professional but also creates quick, easy and affordable content for you to tell your brand story.

RTÉ’s Phillp Bromwell is one of the biggest advocates for mobile content creation– check out this fantastic video he created using an iPhone.

So how do you create high-quality, attention grabbing content using your phone? 

Here are former journalist, MoJo advocate, lecturer and Fuzion Account Director, Ciara Jordan’s top tips for creating content with your phone:

Mojo Traiing Fuzion CommunicationsDon’t be afraid

People just like you are creating amazing content every single day using just their phone. If they can do it, so can you, so don’t be afraid to grab your phone and start experimenting with mobile content creation.

Mojo Traiing Fuzion CommunicationsClean your lens

Phones are always put in pockets and a dirty lens can ruin a photo or video – clean it before you start!

Mojo Traiing Fuzion CommunicationsUse the magic square

All modern mobile phones- both Android and iPhone have the ability to put grid lines (check your photo settings) on the photo screen. This will let you take pictures like a professional. Always have your subject in the “magic square”  or the middle square – this will make your photos engaging and balanced

Shoot horizontal video

Hold your phone horizontal if you are creating video – it is very difficult to edit video content created vertically – except if it is a post for Instagram.

Mojo Traiing Fuzion CommunicationsKeep your phone in airplane mode

Disturbing an interview or footage to take a call can really destroy the mood and that can be hard to recreate.

Walk, don’t zoom!

Zooming with your phone will pixelate the image and won’t be high enough quality. So, it is best to move closer to the subject rather than zooming towards them

Creating content on your phone is very rewarding and easy. Before long, you’ll be on your way to creating great content that engages your audience in ways that would have been unimaginable just a few years ago.

Good luck!

If you would like to find out more on mobile content creation or to find out about Fuzion’s Mojo training workshop, from our offices in Dublin and Cork: contact Ciara Jordan or visit our website www.fuzion.ie

Gina London – The Message is clear: Soft skills are a critical part of success

September 3, 2017

Back to school

It’s back to school time for the kids!

While we prepare to deal with the school-run surge in morning traffic, my daughter Lulu and the rest of Ireland’s students are (blessedly) preparing to sling on their book bags again.

Which reminds me, I spoke last Tuesday to a high level group of HR directors from an assortment of top tech companies.

Why do these professionals remind me of schoolchildren? – because we grown-up employees have a lot in common with not-yet-grown-up pupils!

The HR directors shared some of the biggest issues employees say they’re facing.

Top concerns centered around well-being and communications. They’re connected – and they’re issues children face as well.

When I lived in Italy, Lulu went to Aliotti, the most progressive primary school in town.

There, under the guidance of director Donata Baroni and English instructor Pavlina Checcacci, students are taught so-called ‘soft-skills’ alongside other subjects as part of core curriculum.

You can’t teach only knowledge anymore,” Pavlina says. “Twenty years ago, you went to university and studied a subject like engineering. The methodologies didn’t change for about every 10 years. Now it’s every five years. So, when you get out of school, what you learned is already out of date. Today, we need people who can communicate. That makes the difference.

If two people have the same amount of knowledge, yet one also has soft skills and the other one does not, the difference in their success is significant. Your success in business starts in primary school,” Pavlina says.

Likewise, here in Ireland, John Doran, guidance counsellor at Patrician Secondary School in Newbridge, is championing his own approach called ‘Ways to Wellbeing‘, which, he says, “encourages students to adopt a growth mindset and to communicate with confidence“. It is currently being taught in 120 schools in Ireland and Europe. “If we don’t consciously teach young people to communicate, find their voice and create a literacy around emotional intelligence, we may end up with a generation in a fast-changing world that is unemployed, under-employed, or unemployable” John states.

Here in the business world, it’s high time to get serious about soft skills.

They’re not soft, they’re critical!

Let’s compare some student approaches to what we can do in our own professional lives:

1 Learn to give and receive constructive feedback

Here’s an example from Aliotti: Each child draws a picture. The artwork is put up on the wall. Each child is given a Post-it note and instructed to write one thing they like about the picture, one suggestion of what to do differently next time and then another thing they like.  The classic “compliment sandwich”.

At an early age and with a distinct twist, the children aren’t allowed to simply write something they “don’t like” in the middle. They must frame the criticism as a suggestion for the future.

Each artist reads the feedback aloud and thanks the writers.

This approach is structured and it’s a big deal – Imagine how more effective our business meeting debriefs would be if we had all learned, as children, how to organise our thoughts this way.

Productivity would surely increase if we spent less time getting personally offended and defensive from feedback. Learning not to punish the past but empower the future is a trademark of effective communicators.

2 Learn to work in groups

The HR directors who gathered at McKesson Cork’s remodelled offices, checked out the new “collaboration pods” – designed to get employees away from individual work stations and come together as teams.

More and more firms are updating work environments this way.

Similarly, John’s ‘Ways to Wellbeing‘ programme encourages group sharing for his students and Aliotti’s Pavlina says they’re committed to stop requiring children to work quietly alone.

When in your life will you sit in a room of 30 adults and not take opportunities to discuss things? We can’t prepare kids for a reality that doesn’t exist.”

3 Learn to be kind to others and yourself

Studies show the number one factor in team effectiveness is emotional sensitivity to the others.

Learning empathy is key because effective teams make sure everyone speaks and contributes to get a lot of ideas on the table and build consensus around the best idea.

‘Ways to Wellbeing’, stresses techniques to help develop more positive and constructive relationships. “We help them change their emotional state from one of fear and anxiety to one of effort and application” says John.

4 Learn how to learn from your mistakes

Aliotti concentrates less on grades and more on the process of problem-solving.

Pavlina puts it this way: “Life is all about the mistakes and errors and learning from them. So, we don’t just correct tests, we ask questions like ‘What did you do? Why did you do that? What can you do differently next time?’

We find the child who gets perfect grades and never makes mistakes may actually have difficulty as they get older. Children who learn how to try again and again may have an advantage.

Top university business schools like Stanford and Harvard are also adding highly interactive classes and exercises to develop these types of people to people skills. Your place of employment can introduce them too. After all, we’re all students in this school called life.

It’s time to learn soft!

From presentations, to one-on-one scenarios, from spoken to written if you have a question about communications that you would like me to deal with in my column in the Sunday Independent please send me an email at gina@fuzion.ie .

Gina London - Fuzion CommunicationsGina London

Gina London is a former CNN anchor and international campaign strategist who is now a Strategic Communications director with Fuzion Communications. She serves as media commentator, emcee and corporate consultant. @TheGinaLondon


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