Posts Tagged ‘Abigail Shaw’

Ladies Sport in the Irish Media: 20×20 Campaign

August 20, 2019

Ladies in Sport 20 20

Over the past few weekends, and of course the next couple of weekends to come, we have been lucky enough to see some fantastic displays of Gaelic Football and Hurling on our National broadcaster RTÉ and of course, the newest addition, Sky Sports. 

However, there’s not a sign of a ladies GAA game to be shown.

A campaign presented by the Federation of Irish Sport is on a mission to create a change in the Irish public and media’s perception of women’s sport. 

The 20X20 campaign is calling on the Irish public to get behind women’s sport to increase media coverage, boost match attendance and to grow female involvement in sport by 20% at the end of 2020. 

Since the start of this campaign, people have been sharing their support on social media by using the hashtags #20X20 and #ShowYourStripes. With over 8,000 followers on Instagram, it is clear that the Irish public are getting behind the drive to end the gender bias which is presented in female sports in Ireland.

But, why do we need to campaign for this equality?

Large international companies such as AIG, Investec, Lidl and KPMG are regularly and actively showing their support for ladies sport.

With AIG as the official sponsor for Dublin GAA, they provided all of the Dublin teams with new, limited edition jerseys for a select number of games over the summer with the 20X20 logo as the main feature.

This was a major boost for the campaign with the logo being shown a number of times on National television. The ladies footballers wore the limited edition jersey against Waterford in the All-Ireland Senior Championship on July 13th.

The Dublin Senior footballers also wore the jersey on July 13 during their All-Ireland SFC Quarter-final Group Phase 1 against Cork and the camogie team sported the jersey on July 20 during their All-Ireland Senior Championships Group 2 match against Clare at home.

Ladies Dublin team

Another huge moment for the 20X20 movement was the 20X20 banner which was proudly displayed in Croke Park recently before the All-Ireland Semi Final between Dublin and Mayo. However, the 20X20 campaign isn’t the only major player in the efforts to support ladies sport, well GAA in particular.

From the beginning of this campaign, it has been amazing to see National broadcasters and online media such as RTÉ Sport, Off The Ball (Newstalk), Sports JOE and HER.ie show their support for ladies sport in Ireland. 

However, they are our “National Broadcaster”, and surely they have an obligation to fill by providing their support and showing equality to ladies sport and GAA in general.

In my opinion, the real champion supporters of this campaign are the smaller club and county channels such as the “WeAreMeath” and “TalkAGoodGame” podcasts and the Hogan Stand social media accounts. 

We are meath

Looking back at some of the recent phenomenal display of GAA, from both club and inter county championship, both men and women’s games were equally broadcast and commented on. TINY background teams (no more than four people) are able to commentate and share results and opinions from almost every game which took place in the Meath Football Championship over the weekend. Surely this is a step in the right direction to gain the credit and support which is well and truly deserved in ladies sport in Ireland. 

In 2015, Lidl commenced a three year partnership with the Ladies Gaelic Football Association (LGFA).

A men’s Gaelic Football or Hurling Championship final sees Croke Park at capacity and typically receives 1.3 million TV viewers. It is hugely visible through multiple sponsorships and advertising.

Ladies Gaelic Football enjoyed no such support. It was largely not televised and fan turnout is significantly lower (under 30,000 at Championship Final- just about filled the lower tier of the stand).

Although the Lidl campaign was to primarily lead to more sponsorship for ladies teams, when working hand in hand with the 20X20 campaign, they have drastically changed the opinion of the Irish public towards ladies sports by achieving more sponsorship, media coverage, social media “chat” and attendance at games.  

Talk a Goog Game - podcast

However, even though a lot has changed in ladies sport, there is still a lot to be done.

To see more ladies games covered on RTÉ would be the ultimate goal rather than just on TG4, but the media is slowly but surely showing more support for ladies sport, be it through smaller, local club podcasts to larger online and national media outlets.

Keep fighting for ladies sports and #ShowYourStripes!

Abigail Shaw - Fuzion CommunicationsAbigail 

Abigail Shaw is a PR Executive with Fuzion Communications, a Marketing, PR , Graphic Design and Digital Marketing agency with offices in Dublin and Cork, Ireland

 

 

Should we be using the Irish language more frequently in Ireland’s Media/PR industry?

May 29, 2019

The topic of the Irish language amongst Irish people can be a very touchy subject.

Only 73,000 Irish people speak the Irish language on a daily basis – and the other 4.7 million of us don’t!

Why is this?

Is it because of how Irish is taught to us in school, or is it just our lack of exposure to the language?

Even though about 95% of the Irish population cannot speak Irish fluently or do not use it on a daily basis, we are quite protective over the language in general.

To many, the Irish language is part of our Nation’s individual identity. We tend to view the Irish language as part of our heritage and culture, and it also separates us from and makes us different from other countries who primarily speak English.

If we are so precious over our language, then why is it not used more regularly? In my opinion, I think that we are afraid of the language due to how it was taught to us in school.

In recent years, the Irish language is slowly but surely making a more frequent appearance in our daily lives, though our media.

RTE 2FM have been a great role model by showing us that the Irish language can be fun.

This time last year, presenter, Tracy Clifford was not fluent in Irish at all. She took some time out to learn the language and since then she has presented a full show “As Gaeilge”, and this was a huge hit amongst listeners.

2FM superstar, Eoghan McDermott is a major advocate for the Irish language.

Since 2016, he has produced a full Irish music album, called “CEOL”. This album has featured some massive stars such as Ed Sheeran, Picture This, Macklemore, Saoirse Ronan and many more.

Since 2016, Eoghan has given away over 500,000 copies of the album to schools and competition winners all over the country.

This is such a huge undertaking, and a major commitment to the Irish language by 2FM and Eoghan.

According to Eoghan, he believes that there is a “retrospective appreciation” for (the Irish language), like the big firework Irish project that (2FM) do is the Ceol album.

So we get bands to record a song in Irish. Over the last two years, we’ve given away over 500,000 copies of CEOL and I find so many people will request a copy, because they did Irish in school and never really appreciated it, but now they are a little bit older and have gone back to learn or have started to try and brush up on Irish”.

The Irish language isn’t a scary thing, so I don’t know why we are afraid to speak/ use our national language in the media or even in our day to day lives. Our language makes us unique, so why don’t we embrace it. The more exposure we have to the language, the more we will understand.

I think most people have a very basic understanding of the language and can generally piece together what is going on.

The language in which we view our media is just the medium, we should be embracing our language and appreciating our cultural originality through Irish.

However, I think with more exposure to the language through our media and different PR campaigns, that people will become less afraid and start to embrace our powerful and unique language.

Check out Is Sinne Óg by Picture This:

Abigail Shaw - Fuzion CommunicationsAbigail 

Abigail Shaw is a PR Executive with Fuzion Communications, a Marketing, PR and Graphic Design agency with offices in Dublin and Cork, Ireland

 

Positive Vibes Only…

February 8, 2019

The INternStarting a new job can be daunting, especially as an intern!

You are at the bottom of the food chain, or so they say, but here, that is most certainly NOT the case.

First week. New faces. New names. Is there anything more frightening? (Well apart from snakes and spiders and birds – weird, I know!).

From the moment I walked in the door, I’ve never had a warmer welcome. Greeted by a beautiful, smiling face, I already feel like part of the team.

The first thing I was told was that Fuzion is ONE BIG TEAM.

Even though there are two offices at two different ends of the country, Dublin and Cork, “How is this going to work? Cork is so far away” were the first thoughts that popped into my head.

However, this thought was quickly wiped away when I received a call from EVERYONE in the Cork office. Yes, I most certainly feel like part of this team (well family) now.

How lovely would it be if every company treated their employees this way? Wouldn’t we all be so much happier in our jobs and happier in ourselves for that matter?

Our work is acknowledged on a regular basis- and honestly, there is nothing nicer than to hear that you’re doing a great job!

You feel valued.

When you are valued and appreciated, it automatically reflects in the work that you do, and when this is acknowledged, there honestly is no better feeling!

Having colleagues who are so passionate about what they do, really drives and motivates you to grow and learn so much more, as an individual and as part of the team.

Even though I am (technically) bottom of the food chain here, I do not feel that way at all.

Being treated as an equal, I believe, is the most important thing about having a successful team and having that special bond, that not a lot of companies have.

So here’s to all of the positive vibes only!

Abigail 

Abigail Shaw is a PR Intern with Fuzion Communications who have offices in Dublin and Cork, Ireland


%d bloggers like this: