Archive for the ‘Training’ Category

From building sites in the UK to teaching 1.3 million young people in Africa to code

October 27, 2018

 Africa Code Week

If you want to get anything done you should ask a busy person!

This must be the big lesson that I picked up when I sat down to record an episode of the Fuzion Win Happy podcast with the CEO of Camden Education Trust and Co-Founder of Africa Code Week,  Bernard Kirk.

An early experience on building sites in the UK set off a powerful light bulb moment for Bernard – without education you will struggle, as he witnessed so many Irishmen slogging their way through life until they could no longer manage the physical toil that was required to do that job.

Bernard is a teacher who progressed to teaching teachers and then got involved in a myriad of events and initiatives that encouraged our youth to advance themselves.

When a Minister asked him to organise a Science and Technology Festival in the West of Ireland this sparked an endless involvement in other projects and initiatives all with the same goal of advancing the potential of young people through education.

Running Africa Code Week, which brings together 1.3 million young people in 35 different countries is a colossal, mind bending achievement.

Where would you even start to organise such an event – Bernard says you pick up the phone, you bring people together, you leverage connections and so on and so on.

Nothing is ever that easy and it is clear that this passionate man doesn’t see roadblocks, he sees opportunities.

Bernard reckons his Irishness is one of his Superpowers and it gives him the unique ability to open doors everywhere.

Click below to listen to the podcast and hear about how this very busy man does it!!

Fuzion Win Happy Podcast – Education is the key to everything

Enjoy the show!

Greg 

Greg Canty is a Partner of Fuzion Communications who offer Social Media Consultancy Services from our offices in Dublin and Cork, Ireland

Cracking the “Social Media” Training Code

April 2, 2018

Social Media e-learning

Incredibly we have been running social media courses since May 2010!

This was the new thing, the new way to reach your customers and promote you and your business and it was free to use!!

I do think a big part of the reason it exploded at the time was because we were immersed in an awful recession and most people had virtually no funds to do anything, let alone promote their business.

So the simple advice was, grab the relevant platforms (at the time it was Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn) and use them to tell your story and engage with your target audience.

In the earliest training that we delivered, it was all about the functionality – step by step we would show all the participants how to do everything on each of the platforms.

As time went on we changed the emphasis on “why” first and then “how“.

This approach was designed to get people engaged with the simple idea that, if you knew what you could achieve with social media and you understood the special role it could play in your communications mix, then you were more likely to dive in and apply the learnings.

I think this approach worked much better but there was still a problem, and I put this down to what I call the “teeth brushing” aspect of social media.

When you leave the half day or full day social media course (or any training for that matter) it is up to you and you alone to implement the learnings and make room in your life for a new habit, a social media habit.

To be effective for you, it should be just like teeth brushing, you just do it automatically as part of your routine.

To this day, I still believe that using social media effectively can be one of the most powerful ways of promoting you and your business as well as a brilliant way to make valuable connections.

So why are people not grabbing the opportunity?

The big challenge for me is getting those who take my courses to squeeze all of the potential from the social media platforms, and for the training to go beyond the initial sessions and integrate into their daily routines.

To crack the “training code” we have invested in an e-learning platform, which has enabled us to create unique follow-on programmes that consist of a series of short, practical exercises on each of the social media platforms.

These exercises are delivered to the trainees over a period of time to ensure that they can really learn, through daily implementation away from the classroom and in their own work environment.

If you want to make sure that you and your team, really, really learn let us know!

Check out our Social Media Training services by clicking here.

Greg Canty 

Greg Canty is a Partner of Fuzion Communications, who offer Social Media Consultancy and Training  from our offices in Dublin and Cork, Ireland

 

 

How to Achieve your Goals in 2018

January 3, 2018

Design a Life you Love - Ciara Conlon

This year we will feature some guest bloggers on the Fuzion Communications blog, so we are starting with the fantastic and very lovely Ciara Conlon, who as well as being an author, is just brilliant at making people more productive and feeling much more fulfilled in their lives.

She has a gorgeous approach to Productivity Coaching, which we like to describe as ‘Positive Productivity‘ as its focus is about a better life for you.

Ciara refers to this as ‘Designing your life‘ ….very clever!

Over to Ciara..

Over the next few days and weeks most of us will start to think about change, about giving up bad habits and creating new positive habits.

Traditionally at New Year we think about how this year can be different, we are filled with hope, optimism and excitement.

Unfortunately the statistics for New Year Resolution success is poor.

Apparently only 18% of people succeed with their New Year’s Resolutions, but rather than focus on the negative statistic, what can we learn from the 18% of people who do achieve there goals each year?

1. They Understand the Need for Goals

We need goals if we are to achieve anything outside our normal routine, we need goals to inspire and motivate us and give us direction.

Without them our future is not within our own control, we leave our future to fate.

Being aware of what needs to improve, is the only way that you can consciously make improvements.

Life is a journey that we can only strive to make better, daily, little by little.

Asking yourself a few key questions might help you to focus on areas to improve or change:

  • Are you wasting time doing things that don’t need to be done, or perhaps you are trying very hard and not getting the results that you had hoped for?
  • What can you do to make next year better?
  • What do you really want, but struggle to achieve every year?
  • What would you like to change about yourself?

These answers can be the starting point for setting your goals and they will give you a guideline if you don’t know where to start and help you to get clear about what it is you want to change.

2. They set Motivating Goals that they really want

It might seem pretty obvious but so many people are unclear about what they really want to change.

They set the same goals every year, the same goals as everybody else. Their new year goals become the desires of the masses rather than the needs of the one.

Do you really want to start in the gym on the 1st of January or would you like to start planning a new business or becoming more creative?

The reason why people fail is because they halfheartedly set goals for themselves focused on the things that they know they should be doing.

The problem is a lot of goals that people set don’t actually excite them or at least they haven’t found the motivation in these goals to go out and achieve them.

A goal needs to excite and motivate you – while pounding the pavement might never excite you, the idea of a strong healthy body in your skinny jeans might just do the job!

3. They Start Small

If you try to change everything at once you are setting yourself up for failure.

The key to positive change is to change one thing at a time – Master one habit before moving on to the next.

Charles Duhigg, author of the ‘The Power of Habit’ suggests we focus on what he calls keystone habits. In his book he explains the concept of keystone habits, that when focused on they have a positive and empowering effect.

Keystone habits don’t create a direct cause-and-effect relationship, but they can spark “chain reactions that help other good habits take hold“.

If you master the habit of running you can be guaranteed you will naturally start adopting other habits such as drinking more water and eating healthier. When you master the habit of rising early you will find it so much easier to meditate, journal etc.

These keystone habits are the ones to focus on, others include, family dinners, making your bed in the morning, meditation and planning your day.

So if you plan on making a change this year it may be a good idea to focus on one of these life changing ‘keystone habits’.

4. They Believe they can

Are you one of those people who reluctantly takes on a new habit?

Do you say you are going to do it but inside you don’t really believe it?

A lot of people have set themselves up for failure before they have even started – Deep down they don’t believe they can do it.

Your beliefs will generally determine the outcome so don’t waste your time if you don’t really believe it can be done.

So many people set the goal of losing weight every January but they feel so negative about the goal because they have tried so many times before and failed, that they don’t really believe they will do it.

If this is the case for you the first thing you must consider is, are you doing the same things time after time and failing?

Remember Einstein’s definition of insanity; doing the same things and expecting different results – what do you need to do differently this year?

If the goal is something you do really want, and you don’t understand why you can’t make it work, ask a close friend why they think you haven’t yet achieved your goal, and most importantly be willing to listen to the answer!

5. They are resilient

Successful people in general understand that failure is part of life.

They understand that on the road to getting what they want there will be potholes and barriers, but they stay with it.

Success takes determination and persistence.

The key to reaching your goals is to promptly get up each time you fall down. Try to preempt the challenges and plan for them, but if you fail, accept it quickly and move on.

It’s really important that you don’t waste time dwelling on the negative.

Monitor your thoughts and make sure you speak to yourself with encouragement rather than condemnation – Forgive yourself and move on.

It is your life and your responsibility to make it a good one, and with a little bit of focus and effort you can create the life you have always dreamed of.

Why not become the designer of your life in 2018?

Ciara Conlon

Ciara Conlon is a Productivity Coach and Motivational Speaker and respected thought leader working with individuals and organisations transforming behaviours in order to create more productive and happier people and workplaces.

You can find out more at www.ciaraconlon.com or on her Facebook page

Ciara will be running an evening event on January 25th in Wood Quay Venue, in Dublin called “Design a Life you Love”

A special “two for the price of one” offer is available until January 7th.

 

My week’s work experience

May 2, 2017

Transition year student Niamh McInerney from St. Mary’s Secondary School Mallow recently completed a week’s work experience with us. Before she left she wrote a blog about her experience

Where to even begin…. It was such a brilliant week.

As my two favourite subjects in school are business and English I decided that I would go to a PR and marketing company for a week of work experience. After some research I came across Fuzion. I rang them up and explained that I was looking for work experience and they kindly accepted my request to join them for a week in late April.

I was so excited to get experience in PR, marketing and design as this could be a possible future career for me. I won’t lie, I was a bit nervous as I did not know anyone working in the company so therefore I really did not know what to expect.

When I arrived for my first day of work experience all the staff were so welcoming and kind towards me. I really expected to be just doing the photocopying and making tea and coffee (which I would not have minded), but instead I learnt how to do a media analysis report and to write up a press release. It was very interesting to get to see all the ins and outs of the various departments in Fuzion.

Make a Will week

On my final day, Alison, one of the PR team kindly brought me along to a photo shoot for the Mercy Hospital Foundation. It was to launch their annual ‘Make a Will Week’ with solicitor Don Ryan. The campaign sees Don help people make a will in return for a donation towards the Mercy Hospital Foundation. It was so interesting to see how the photo shoot was coordinated and I was delighted to be a part of it.

During my week at Fuzion I really learnt so much and was so grateful for all the help and support that the team gave me. It was a really enjoyable week and gave me a great insight into the world of PR!

Niamh McInerney

How to craft the perfect eight-second introduction

April 3, 2017

Gina London - Fuzion Communications

I just got off the phone with the CEO of a charitable organisation here in Ireland. He’s about to head to the US for a conference which will allow him to meet many potential donors. But most of these meetings will be the “reception or networking” type; casual events that aren’t set-up to be formal sales or pitch meetings.

He knows it’s essential he introduces himself in a way that is positive, interesting and leaves the other person wanting to know more.

So I had him rehearse his planned introduction for me. Thank goodness. Because his first go simply sounded like he was trying to pack in too much information. There were too many clunky, jargon words. It sounded like more like a brochure and not a relaxed introduction.

Together we re-crafted his introduction so he could quickly give his audience an upbeat, easy-to-understand interesting impression and then move the conversation back to them.

Knowing that there are exceptions to every rule, here’s my basic Intro How-To:

1 Write down your first thoughts.

Go ahead. Write whatever comes to your mind about yourself and your organisation. Aim for four components: 1. Hi, I’m (Name), 2. (Title) of (Organisation name). 3. We (What your organisation does). 4, (Question for the other person.)

2 Read that aloud and time it.

Do you sound jargony? Did you just go into company-speak? Assume every person is a lay person and think “conversational”. Would your eyes glaze over if you heard someone describe their business the way you’re describing yours? Get real and be tough on yourself.

Focus on your timing. You have between 4-8 seconds to introduce yourself and your organisation. I mean it.

Anything more for an introduction and you’ll sound forced.

Like my CEO, it’s trying too hard. You probably have included superfluous information. People may still be looking at you, but they’re likely no longer tuning in.

3 Give that a hard edit.

Okay. Now get out your scalpel or razor and cut! Cut out the jargon, the parentheticals, the disclaimers, the tangents, whatever. Your intro should be high-level and understandable. Go into more detail as the conversation unfolds. Not all at once.

4 Add a superlative – as long as it’s interesting and accurate.

Is your organisation the first, the largest, the newest, the something-est? If so, lead with that – in a friendly, not cocky way.

If you have to reach too far for this one, don’t force it. But at least consider it. Adding credibility adds interest.

5 Refine and rehearse.

Now re-time yourself. Do you have all four components? Are you under eight seconds? Say it aloud. Say it again. Say it again. Like you mean it. Do you sound effortless and conversational?

Don’t forget you’ll need to be able to say this without thinking really – as you’ll likely be surrounded by other “circles” of people at the conference or networking event. It will be buzzy and noisy.

So you should have this ready to roll. Be memorized but don’t sound rote. Make sure you have the question rehearsed.

Of course, it’s good to have two or three questions prepared so you don’t sound like a single-question robot.

Introducing yourself is not the time to “Give the pitch” or “Position your organisation.”

It’s your first impression – and even more importantly, it’s your chance to begin to get to know the other person. Relationships take time.

Practice doesn’t make perfect; practice makes permanent. So make sure you take time to purposefully and conversationally craft your introduction.

And remember how I opened this article by saying I was working with a CEO? These tips are not only for them. It doesn’t matter whether you are the top brass in an organisation or a new hire just starting out. You have goals don’t you?

Where do you want to be in six months? Six years? It’s largely up to you. Becoming a better communicator will help give you that competitive edge.

I can promise you that as someone who grew up in the tiny rural town of Farmland, Indiana (yes, that’s actually the name of the place), I learned a thing or two about crafting and delivering content after the rigours of delivering hundreds of thousands of live-shots during my career with CNN combined with my time as an international campaign strategist. I do not write or talk the same way I did as a girl.

Developing better communication skills is something we can all achieve.

The same way you are developing your competencies in whatever field you work in, you can also start focusing on how to re-train the way you speak about yourself and your work. You can become a more strategic communicator.

Practice doesn’t make perfect; practice makes permanent.

So, today, let’s start at the beginning. Make sure you take time to purposefully and conversationally craft your introduction.

Gina

Gina London is a former CNN anchor and international campaign strategist who is now a director with Fuzion Communications. She serves as media commentator, emcee and corporate consultant.

This is the first ‘The Communicator’ column that Gina has written for the Sunday Independent

My Crash Course in PR, Marketing and Design

March 17, 2017

Work experience

As my two favourite subjects in school are business and art I had a bright idea to apply to a marketing company for my weeks work experience. I was delighted to see that Fuzion Communications accepted my proposal to follow the employees around for 4 days!

I expected to be photocopying, filing and making coffee, which of course I wouldn’t have minded doing, but to my pleasant surprise it was the opposite. I was being asked did I want coffee and tea!

My time in both the PR department and the design department were both equally enjoyable.

In the PR department I learned a lot about using social media and not just newspapers to advertise businesses. Also, how not only is the article important, but the headline and the photographs are equally vital to grasp the reader’s attention.

On the Wednesday, Saidhbh, one of the PR team kindly let me shadow her on one of her trips out to take pictures for their social media posts. It was extremely interesting to see the ins and outs of PR and its not easy!

From my observation humour and sarcasm are the most prominent features in the design department, along with skill of course!

They know the computer keyboard like the back of their hand, they can also make a picture taken by a two year old look like a Caravaggio painting. The Photoshop tutorials were one of my favourite activities of the week.

Although I wouldn’t have the best IT background, with help from instructions and annoying Jonathan, the head of the design department with many questions, I wasn’t as shocking as I thought I would be at them.

I can safely say that this was much better than going back to my old primary school and looking after screaming children for a week even though that was also very eventful.

My experience here was great and much appreciated.

Kate D'ArcyKate

Kate D’Arcy, Transition Year Student

Twitter: @katedarcy1469

Well done to the very enthusiastic and lovely Kate who was a pleasure to have in the office for the week and a credit to her parents and her teachers. She rose to the challenge of writing a blog post that I put to her.

Greg Canty 

Greg Canty is a Partner of Fuzion Communications, a full service national agency that offers Marketing, PR and Graphic Design services from our offices in Dublin and Cork, Ireland

 

 

How you shake hands sends a message

March 13, 2017

Trump Handshake

“How you shake hands sends a message – Every interaction communicates something”

Last week, I had the privilege to be master of ceremonies at the first Cork University Business School (CUBS) conference.

The speakers included top business leaders and entrepreneurs, including Marissa Brown, one of Ireland’s most successful businesswomen, sharing their visions and their stories.

And it’s precisely how they tell their stories – how well they communicate – that I imagine will largely mark each one of the speakers as the successes they are.

Research shows that when you line up people with equal competencies, the better communicators will always have the competitive edge.

As a former CNN reporter and anchor, I learned the power of communications through the lens of journalism. I later managed international campaigns for politicians like the first female parliamentary candidates in Iraq and opposition parties in Egypt, and on issues like increasing immunisation awareness in Cambodia.

Today, in my current role with Fuzion Communications , I see communications as a solid combination of style and strategy.

What does that have to do with you? 

Without any further preamble from me, find someone and shake their hand.

What did you get?

Did you deliver a warm, firm embrace, fingers curling around the other person’s hand with the pads of your fingers making contact with their hand in a meaningful way?

Did you clasp for a full second, or two? Or did some of you find that you shook hands with a limp, dead fish? Or who got the arm wrestler, the squeezer?

Why do I make a big deal about a handshake?

Because it’s often the very first thing we do when we’re introduced to someone and many of us don’t have any idea about whether we’re doing it right.

But, make no mistake, how you shake hands does send a message. What does shaking hands with the arm wrestler or the dead fish say to you? Every time you interact with someone, you are communicating something either by design or by default.

Communication is not a soft skill, it’s a critical skill

Thankfully, communications is also a skill that can be learned – and put into action for better results – in every part of your lives.

Any time you have what I call a ‘communication event’ you are either moving your relationship forward or backward with another person.

For instance, applying skillful communications is critical when you first have a big idea. How are you going to pitch your product, platform or service? Even more than market research and projected figures, the story you tell will dictate whether or not you connect with your intended audience.

How do you take the kernel of an idea, or, as you mature in your field, the depth of your knowledge, and best communicate to various audiences?

It takes emotional intelligence and training.

Content and delivery

There are two main facets of any communication event: content and delivery, and there are teachable strategies around each.

Before you create any content, you need to apply a strategy for your audience, intent and message – in that order.

Here’s what you should consider:

1. Audience – Who are you addressing? Are they new hires or veterans? Senior management or the executive board? Women, men or both? Do they prefer Elvis or the Beatles? Tea or coffee? PCs or Macs? Every audience is different. Try to get inside their heads.

I sometimes ask clients to write down their agenda and then write a second agenda from their audience’s point of view.

Then I have them throw out their own agenda and begin again from the second one!

2. Intent – Your intent is never simply to inform. If you’re only doing that, put your information in an email and hit the send button.

You must be trying to motivate or inspire your audience to some sort of action, so define your goal very clearly. Too often I see this one overlooked and the goal becomes too broad or ill-defined.

What is it exactly that you want your audience to do after you’re finished speaking? Even if it’s just to agree to another meeting, that’s OK. Be very specific.

3. Message – Only after you have deliberated the first two points should you move on to craft your message. Like intent, this must be clear too. Write it down in one sentence.

Here’s the definition I learned from organising campaigns: A message should be ‘brief, memorable, repeatable, emotional and data-backed’.

Your message is your “call to action“, your spoken declaration of your written intent. State it clearly and state it often. Don’t assume your audience is getting it.

The delivery

Once you’ve crafted your content, how do you deliver your message?

Think of a presentation as being supported by three legs of a stool: words, para-lingual and body language.

1.Words – Use powerful, colourful, imaginative words. Don’t waffle or equivocate. Be bold. Choose active verbs not flat ones.

For people who say words are less than 10% of communications, try watching a foreign film without subtitles and tell me if you understand 90% of what’s going on! Words matter.

2. Para-lingual – This mouthful just means the way we say our words – the tone, the pace, the volume, the pitch.

These are tools we naturally vary when we’re talking to family and friends, but they often get left behind when we deliver “business stuff”.

When we don’t use them, they leave us sounding robotic, rote, dull and lifeless.

3. Body language – Unless we’re master poker players, our bodies are always ‘leaking’ our emotions – and people are always reading us.

How do you hold your arms or hands, and does your listening face look interested or bored? Other people notice, so take ownership and get trained to appear more engaged.

Reaching your audience

Like it or not, both Donald Trump and Brexit proponents discovered how to communicate potentially complicated messages in simple ways to reach their target audiences.

While critics may argue that those simple messages also played on constituents’ anger or fear, imagine what can happen when one creates simple, captivating messages that seek to inspire and motivate people to positive action?

Gina London - Fuzion PRGina London is an award-winning former CNN correspondent who now serves as director of Strategic Communications at Fuzion.

Cumulus Clouds and First Women.

August 4, 2016

Aer Lingus - Captain Grainne Cronin

I was having a super meeting with a new client last week, you know those round table moments when everyone is on the same page and all getting excited about the strategy and the jobs to be done to bring this to life.

We started discussing “Leaning In” and progressed to the first Aer Lingus female pilot. I recalled a conversation long ago with my Dad, who trained Aer Lingus pilots. Avoiding answering the question about what I had achieved in school that day, I pushed back to Dad and enquired what had he achieved?

He started talking about how he was training the first Aer Lingus female pilot, and that they had been working in the Simulator that day. Months later I saw a shot on the front of the paper (her first flight was in January, 1978) of Captain Grainne Cronin, sitting in the cockpit proudly, after receiving her wings. (the pic above was a retirement pic in 2010 after 33 years as a pilot)

I headed off to chat to Dad; “Was that the same girl that he was in the Simulator with?” “Yes”, he replied “ and what is going to make her so great is that she saw beyond the Cumulus clouds and really worked hard to achieve her goal. Sometimes when you are a woman you have to push yourself even more to grab hold of your dreams”.

Because of Captain Cronin’s dream and hard work breaking the mould, many other women were empowered to follow their dreams, and Aer Lingus now employs more female pilots that the global average of around 10%.

So let us ladies take a moment and celebrate the ‘first women’, those who break new ground and make the rest of us realise that we can go as far as our capabilities allow: Presidential Nominee Hillary Rodham Clinton, President Mary Robinson, Attorney General Maire Whelan and Chief Justice Susan Denham.

Ladies and Gentleman fasten your seat belts we are going through the Cumulus clouds, Have a safe flight!

Aisling White - FuzionAisling White 

Aisling White is an Account Director with Fuzion PR, Marketing and Graphic Design based in our office in Dublin, Ireland

Raise Your Game

June 5, 2016

CiT - Architecture course

I’ve been to a few final year exhibition openings as part of my life as a student, as a college lecturer and as creative director here in Fuzion.  Not just in graphic design, but in multi-media, fashion, ceramics and the full gamut of fine art courses on offer in a number of third level colleges.

It’s a great way to see up-and-coming talent, current trends in the various fields of study, and hiring talented staff (we have taken on two graduates from the final year exhibition in CIT’s Visual Communications courses in the past few years). But its taken until this year for me to be absolutely blown away by both an exhibition and an attitude from a course in the way that the Interior Architecture course in CIT did when I visited it last Wednesday.

Titled TRANSCEND 2016, the exhibition is primarily a showcase for the graduating 4th years, with work on display also by the 3rd years (and if you wander off the beaten track a little, some incredible work by other students from other years too!).

A number of things happen from the very moment that you enter the building.

Firstly, from the exterior of the building, it’s a pretty grotty looking 80’s dull-as-dishwater brown factory. But this is the beginning of the magic show.

Marc Riain - CIT Architecture

It has been commandeered by the department a couple of years ago and transformed (by Marc O’Riain, a senior lecturer in the department and an architect in his own right http://www.ruaarchitects.ie/ ) into a multi-award winning space that starts to impress you immediately, from the large Norman Foster model at the entrance to the innovative use of space and materials.

And this is all before you get to see any of the students’ work. As a space, you can see how it inspires the students to work harder and better, to want to be more creative and strive towards a career in their chosen field. There are several shipping containers along the left hand side of the space that create offices, work spaces, physical walls/dividers in an open space that appears to be as large (and open) as a football field.

You can see how it was a factory – and in that Warholian sense it still is a factory, but now instead of manual operators creating loss prevention devices, it nurtures talent and creativity. Students within this vast building have individual spaces to design and work, with communal areas so people can see what others are doing (and perhaps be inspired by this work) and it’s a space to be immensely proud of.

You would love to come to college here.

Transcend 2016- CIT ArchitectureBut back to the exhibition itself for a moment. The work level seems incredible – a standard of finish and design skills that were very high. Again, it looked like the students themselves had pushed themselves as much as any encouragement from teaching staff. Like they wanted to succeed. Like they had a hunger for it, a passion.

The work is displayed, especially by the 4th year graduates with professional precision and with purpose (have a look for Kristina Malantsuk’s work based on the Cork Bonded Warehouses). And this is where one of the most impressive factors struck me. They wanted jobs. They wanted to become employed practitioners. They could clearly see that this wasn’t a party as a self congratulatory pat on the back for turning up a few hours a day for 4 years, this was a recruitment drive.

And at the opening of the exhibition, something that I have never seen before happened. As Katherine Keane, Department Head & Marc O Riain finished their speeches, Marc ended by pointing at a door towards one of the more private areas of the building and said that anyone who wanted to interview a student could do so in that space.

And no messing, a number of people immediately walked towards that door to do so!

I think that there is a certain irony that the model at the main door is by Norman Foster Architects, because that is exactly what they do in that space – foster architects.

Attitude is so much a part of any success story.

Of course you must want to succeed and you must have a genuine product that is worthy of success. But you must look like you want to succeed.

Whats the point in having the best service or product in the world if it looks rubbish? You are only fooling yourself, because no one else will believe in something that looks like you don’t believe in it. From the minute you step into the space that is the Architecture Factory, you want it to be amazing, because it tells you that its amazing, and you believe in it.

Check out the superb work that is happening right now in Cork by visiting the Facebook page or the website for the exhibitions.

Well done to all these hungry students and the lecturers who are inspiring them to be the best.

Jonathan

Jonathan Leahy Maharaj leads the Graphic Design Department in Fuzion with offices in Dublin and Cork, Ireland 

 

 

Fan girl

February 15, 2016

Beatemania

I’ll be the first to admit it. At almost twenty two years old, I am a fangirl!

There, I said it. I’ve been a fangirl for the best part of eight years. It began when I was fourteen, where I was equal parts a Big Brother fan and a Twihard (the most embarrassing fan name ever!!), a die-hard Twilight Saga fan.

Once I had joined Twitter during my Junior Cert, the obsessions took off even further. I connected with people all over the globe who loved the same things as me, something I still do to this day. My friends refused to follow me because these things were all I talked about!

I’ve been through many obsessions. Now, I am happily settled in the K-pop world for almost three years. South Korea and their entertainment industry is my biggest love and passion. But there was two fandoms that really made me the person I am today.

A boy group named The Wanted came into my life in late 2010, when a friend and mutual Twitter follower introduced me to their debut song “All Time Low”.  I was hooked on their every move and every word. My friends and I knew the managers, the live band, the security, even the members’ family and friends were in our following list.

It’s funny to say it, but my life changed after I became a fan. I met some of the best friends in the world at signings, radio stations and freezing our bums off outside hotels. When the band split in 2014, a good thirty of us gathered together at their final Irish concert, all bawling but thankful for the five lads who brought us together. We were – pun intended – glad they came!

We always had issues with their management, however. We always could tell when something wasn’t done right, when they weren’t getting radio play or column inches in the press.

We would take to our Twitters and our Facebooks and we would hassle our followers, family and friends to listen to their songs, to watch their music videos and to buy their albums. We even held flashmobs on Grafton Street, where we made up dances to their songs and blared them from HMV’s speakers. We were crazy but we were undoubtedly passionate.

The same sort of promotions went on for another of my favourite groups, Lawson. We would give out leaflets and busk outside St Stephen’s Green, playing their songs. Both groups took great interest in our work and even today, my friends and I are still on close terms with the members of Lawson, during their hiatus.

A friend of mine pointed me in the direction of my college course in IADT, that partners marketing, accounting and cultural studies with film, theatre and, my first love, music.

I quickly discovered that there are jobs that allow you to promote for a living. As soon as the opportunity came for me to spread my wings and fly into the workplace, I rocketed into research. And with a little help from my glorious personality (I’m modest too!!) I find myself sitting in the Fuzion PR office in Warrington Place, Dublin.

In case you hadn’t guessed, I am the baby of the Fuzion family, finally getting a chance to do what I love in the real world. I’m working as my internship with some absolutely incredible people who are so helpful and fun to be around. Luck is truly on my side with this one and I’m looking forward to what comes my way here in the next four months.

It just goes to show kids, you can find your niche where you least expect it, even in a boyband!

Sarah O'Brien - Fuizon PRSarah

Sarah O’Brien is a PR intern with Fuzion PR based in Dublin


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